La Casa dei Tajarin

After a long and lovely lunch in the Bussia vineyards of Barolo, a massive dinner probably wasn’t entirely necessary, but I’m not one to turn down a home cooked meal, especially when the home cooks are Mauro Musso and his mother.

I’ve already written about Mauro and his small pasta company Casa dei Tajarin, but on Monday I visited his labortorio for the first time. It occupies two rooms on the ground floor of his family home. One room, which measures 16 square meters, has a pasta machine and mixer, while the other, 18 meters square, contains the drying cabinet and shelves stocked with hand-packaged pasta. The operation is small but Mauro makes the most of it.

Mauro Musso, Casa dei Tajarin

After a quick tour of the laboratorio and adjacent gourmet wine and food shop (open by appointment only), we headed upstairs for dinner with Mr. and Mrs. Musso and a pair of Mauro’s friends.

Antipasto

To start, there were hard boiled eggs and roasted peppers filled with salsa tonnata, a paste of tuna, capers, and anchovies. This was followed by Mauro’s tajarin made from Mulino Marino’s Manitoba flour and organic eggs, and tossed with a rich sauce of sauteed onion, rabbit livers and chicken stomachs. The name in Italian sounds way more appetizing (l’antico comodino di frattaglie di cortile), but I promise you the dish was outstanding.

Tajarin con sugo di frattaglie

Next up was Neals Yard Stichelton, the last thing I expected to find on a table in the Langhe but boy am I glad it was there. This was served alongside Mauro’s famous bunet, a flan of cocoa, organic milk, organic eggs, sugar cane, and crumbled amaretti. With our rich and creamy desserts we drank a 1958 fortified Cannonau, another surprise on this table in the Langhe, but a pleasant and smooth one with a licorice bouquet.