/Rome
  • This walking tour traces the history of cuisine in the Testaccio neighborhood, a working class district known for its traditional Roman fare, owed in large part to the slaughterhouse and cattle market that were created in the area at the end of the 18th century. With a prime location along the river, Testaccio was a hub of import/export activity during the industrial revolution and still clings to those traditions as the area becomes ever more gentrified. We will explore the new Testaccio market, a recently constructed edifice steps from the MACRO Museum, and which sells produce, meat, cheeses, and more. At the old slaughterhouse, we will discus offal and other poor cuts, and visit bakeries and food shops to taste local specialties. Contact [email protected] for details.
  • This walking tour explores the history of Roman food commerce and focuses on delis, bakeries, cafes and gelato shops in Rome’s historical center. We will graze through central Rome and taste bread, coffee, gelato and cheese while delving deep into the city’s cultural history. This is the perfect walk for first time visitors to Rome who are looking for food havens in the historic center, as well as a wide overview of what the Roman culinary scene has to offer. Contact [email protected] for details.
  • The neighborhood just north of the Vatican is pleasantly tourist free and residential, making for a truly local experience as residents shop for their groceries. Its food shops and covered market, a modern construction that is one of the largest in Rome, are sensational and the area is home to the world’s best pizza by the slice. This walking tour will explore this overlooked district and focus on its delis, bakeries, cafes and gelato shops, including a visit of the Trionfale Market. Visitors who have already explored the historic center or are looking for a more authentic culinary experience will come away with an understanding of how Roman residents eat and shop in their own neighborhoods. Contact [email protected] for details.
  • This walking tour visits two distinctly Roman districts that face one another across the Tiber River. Despite the fact that Testaccio and Trastevere’s authentic appeal attracts an increasing number of visitors, the areas are still free from the larger crowds that inundate the centro storico, thus offering an unhindered view of how locals shop, eat, and use their pubic spaces. The tour begins in Testaccio and visits traditional food shops, as well as the new Testaccio Market, home to stalls selling fabulous fresh and prepared foods. After grazing through Testaccio and getting to know its traditions and specialties, the tour heads across the river to Trastevere for a sweet finale.
  • Originally the food of the poor (cucina povera means peasant cooking), offal is now regarded as a delicacy and is served in the best of Rome’s traditional restaurants. We will begin the tour with a walk through Testaccio, paying visits to the market and the former slaughterhouse. During our time we will discuss the history of cucina povera in Italy and, specifically, Rome. While the concept of nose to tail dining has become trendy of late, we will explore the historical roots of this tradition, which has a long, rich history in the city. If requested, the tour will culminate with a curated lunch of organ meats and poor cuts at a typical restaurant. Contact [email protected] for details.
  • As far back as the 2nd century B.C.E., Jews have made their home in Rome and represent the oldest Jewish community in the world outside Israel. What we recognize today as Roman Jewish cooking is fruit of universal Jewish dietary guidelines and, perhaps most importantly, the community’s forced isolation into a gated ghetto for 300 years, which resulted in a unique spin on traditional Italian and Jewish cuisine, using what limited ingredients were available. Additionally, the cuisine reflects many outsider influences—result of the Jewish diaspora of the 15th century as direct result of the Spanish Inquisition, and again in the 1960s when thousands of Jews fleeing Libya settled in Rome. This walking tour, followed by a curated lunch if requested, will focus on the history and development of Rome’s Jewish food traditions. We will explore 22 centuries of culinary evolution and taste local and seasonal dishes at kosher bakeries and a restaurant in the Jewish Ghetto. Contact [email protected] for details.
  • This tour allows visitors to mix archeology and culinary history in order to better understand the commercial aspect of Rome’s cuisine throughout history. Our time begins in the ancient produce and cattle markets near the Tiber River before proceeding to the base of the Capitoline Hill.  As a way to discover well-known sites in a new light, monuments such as at the Circus Maximus also help explain how cuisine was used as a means to satisfy and manipulate the ancient Roman population. We then move to Testaccio, an area where both ancient and modern archeological ruins testify to the diets and tastes of Romans from antiquity to the present day. Our time concludes with a stroll through one of Testaccio’s former slaughterhouses and a visit to Città dell’Altra Economia, a space dedicated to organic food and wine, bringing our lesson full circle from antiquity to the modern day. Contact [email protected] for details.
  • The world of Italian wine, with its 20 regions and hundreds of appellations, can be intimidating. During this tasting held at a wine bar, we will demystify Italian vino by sampling an array of wines paired with food. Sparkling white wines from northern Italy, rich rosé wines from Abruzzo, or reds from Lombardy are just some of what may be covered. This is the perfect experience for those wishing to gain knowledge into excellent, affordable wines and come away with tools to bring a special bottle of Italian wine home or make an excellent selection at their local wine shop. Contact [email protected] for details.
  • The quality and production of Italian craft beers has increased exponentially in the past few years. More and more craft beer purveyors are becoming part of the Italian landscape to go alongside more established names like Baladin, who helped start the trend. During our tasting, we may sample beers made with heirloom wheats, made from grape must or fruit, even briny oyster stouts made with local seafood. This is an excellent way to learn about the country’s traditions, trends, and producers during a beer tasting and food pairing at a Roman pub. Contact [email protected] for details.
  • Cocktails have hit their resurgence internationally and one only has to think about classic ingredients like vermouth and Campari to remember that Italy has strong ties to the cocktail industry. This cocktail seminar places Italian cocktails in their cultural context and explores ancient mixed drinks, lost pre-war spirits, local spirit production and Italian-style cocktails. From classics, such as the Negroni and theMilano-Torino, to modern twists, a strong emphasis will be placed on the resurgence of the cocktail in Rome’s historical center, looking both at hotel bars and new drinking establishments. The tour will begin with a short walking tour of the Campo de’ Fiori district detailing contemporary drinking culture followed by a curated drinking session at Barnum Café, which has quickly established itself as one of the premiere cocktail bars in the historic center. At the end of our time together you will come away with a greater understanding of cocktail culture in Italy, from aperitifs to digestifs, as well as knowledge of the history behind the cocktails and spirits most common to the country. Contact [email protected] for details.
  • This tasting, which takes place at a wine bar, will focus on “natural” wine—wine that has been made with minimal chemical intervention in the vineyard and cellar (the vast majority of wine does not fall into this category!). Unfiltered sparkling wines, white wines made with long maceration on the skins, or reds produced in terracotta amphorae are just some of the varieties we may taste during our time together. We will also address the controversies surrounding Italian wine labeling, seek a definition of the elusive term “natural wines” and taste delicious—and affordable—bottles. Contact [email protected] for details.
  • This walking tour takes a layer-by-layer look at the complex archaeological zones of the Coliseum, Palatine Hill, and Roman Forum. Within these sites we will be able to trace the origins of Rome from the Romulus and Remus myth through Republican Rome up to the Roman Empire. Caesar, Nero, and Trajan are just some of the names we’ll encounter as we use these three sites to discuss everything from propaganda and politics to daily life and entertainment. The tour provides context for other ancient ruins in the city and leaves visitors with a deeper understanding of ancient Roman culture. Contact [email protected] for details.