/Ciuri Ciuri, Rome

Ciuri Ciuri, Rome

UPDATE: I NO LONGER ENDORSE CIURI CIURI. Since it opened in March 2007, I have cursed Ciuri Ciuri, a Sicilian gelateria-pasticceria-rosticceria in Rome’s Monti district, on a daily basis. I am utterly unable to walk past the place without getting a little something–cassata, cannolo, granita, or gelato. Thankfully, there are miniature versions of all these classics. The trouble is, I live a block away from Ciuri Ciuri, I pass it 4 times a day, and those mini cannoli add up!

At Ciuri Ciuri, the fresh, seasonal ingredients that go into their desserts produce very high quality-and high calorie-results. Sugar is a protagonist in Sicilian desserts, which tend to be sweeter than their mainland counterparts. In many of them, including cassata siciliana, cioccolato di Modica, and pasticini di mandorla, the sugar grains are still intact, too abundant to dissolve entirely, giving a distinctive texture to these sweets. Aside from sugar, Sicilian pastries typically feature almonds, ground into a paste for cookies or coarsely chopped for granite, or ricotta, the main ingredient in the cannolo and the cassata. While I am totally unable to control my sweet tooth, as long as this place is around, I will never be protein or calcium deficient!

Via Leonina 18/19/20
Open daily 9am-midnight

NB There is a second Ciuri Ciuri on Via Labicana 126 in Rome and yet another in the historic center of Trapani.

2016-01-07T14:38:46+00:00 September 13th, 2008|Categories: Food & Wine, Rome & Lazio|13 Comments

13 Comments

  1. Carolina Ramos September 15, 2008 at 1:17 pm - Reply

    Ciao Katie!

    I think that the high amount of sugar in Sicilian pastry (as well as Andalusian) is due to its Arabic roots/influences (sugar, as you well know, was introduced by Arabs in Europe). Sugar was also considered a spice in the Middle Age and therefore of common use in some Arabic recipes (actually for the “chosen few” who could afford it).

    Carolina

  2. Katie September 15, 2008 at 10:26 pm - Reply

    It is so fascinating that southern European cuisine still so many shows signs of Arab influence-almonds, oranges, persimmon (I cannot wait for the season to start!), eggplant, spices, the list goes on and on…I’m curious, do you have paste di mandorla in Andalusian desserts? Ciao!

  3. Carolina Ramos September 16, 2008 at 8:10 am - Reply

    Of course we do: mazapán, crema de almendras, almendrados, polvorones, alfajores… (almendra=almond). We also use “esencia de azahar” (azahar=orange flower), aniseed, honey, sesame seeds, candied fruit… As you see, there are a lot of similarities!

    ¡Hasta pronto!

  4. PAPA PARLA September 18, 2008 at 7:59 am - Reply

    as long as this placei is around, I will never be protein or calcium deficient!
    SPELLING ERROR ABOVE. I READ THIS ARTICLE WITH GREAT DISBELIEF. IT BROUGHT TO MIND THE GREAT GRANULAR SUGAR TESTIMONY OF LOCAL TRANSPLANTED ITALIAN NEW JERSEY CONFECTIONERS OF MY YOUTH. MARZIPAN AND CANNOLIS SO GRITTY WITH SUGAR THAT YOU ALMOST THOUGHT IS WAS A MISTAKE. I NOW REALIZE IT WASN’T!

  5. Katie September 18, 2008 at 4:55 pm - Reply

    It is such a shame all those Italian groceries in New Brunswick have closed down. Do you think the one near grandma and grandpa parla’s house is still open? We should drive by the next time I am home. Im curious to see what is there now.

    We have to go back to Sicily for some cannoli. I went with grandpa and mom to this incredible place in Piana degli Albanesi just south of Palermo where they make huge ones. So good. in the mean time I will content myself with cannoli and marzipan from ciuri ciuri downstairs..

  6. Petulia melideo September 19, 2008 at 10:01 am - Reply

    Don’t forget to add the new location in via Labicana!

  7. Katie September 19, 2008 at 11:27 pm - Reply

    You are so right! Ive added it to the post.

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  12. Shannon Welch February 9, 2010 at 9:39 pm - Reply

    My husband and I just spent 3 nights at the Hotel Duca D’Alba facing Ciuri Ciuri. We too found it impossible to look in the windows at the delicious displays and not go in to sample them. We bought a delightful chocolate layered cake with pistachios that we ate together…absolutely every bite! It was worth every step I have to exert to work off the calories! I would guiltlessly eat it again!

    I have tried to find the meaning of Ciuri Ciuri and can’t get an answer, not even from our translator or Wikipedia. So, I imagine you know and can put me out of my curious misery. I would appreciate it!

    Please enjoy this delightful place for us since we live in Canada and probably won’t be back in Rome in the imaginable future, much to my dismay.

    Thank you so much!

    • Katie February 9, 2010 at 10:26 pm - Reply

      Hi Shannon, ciuri means flower in sicilian dialect. “Ciuri Ciuri” is a famous song in dialect and the shop is named for it. I’m so glad you liked it!

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